British Light Dragoon Pattern Flintlock Pistol circa. 1813
(Fur Trade associated gun)

Last updated: 9 January 2017

Configuration

[photo of British Light Dragoon pistol]
British Light Dragoon Pattern Flintlock Pistol, circa. 1813
.67" caliber, 9" barrel length, 15" overall length, brass furniture

[photo of British Light Dragoon pistol]
One piece steel ram rod with spring retainer

[photo of British Light Dragoon pistol]
Royal crown inscribed on flat lock plate
Floral leaf decoration on reinforced cock and lock plate tail
Note: no GR cypher under Crown, No Ordnance broad arrow stamp under pan, no
TOWER stamp on tail of lock plate - this gun was not consigned to the Ordnance Store

[photo of British Light Dragoon pistol]
Side Plate

[photo of British Light Dragoon pistol]
Barrel Stampings
Right: Birmingham Proof Mark: Crown over crossed scepters - BPC
Center: Tombstone Mark: "1" over sitting bird
Left: Birmingham View Mark: Crown over crossed scepters - V

Notes

This Light Dragoon pattern flintlock pistol was produced by an unknown British gunmaker c. 1813.

The one piece steel ram rod, secured by a spring retainer, is original to this gun. Light Dragoon Pistols issued from Government Ordnance Stores were equipped with one piece brass tipped wooden ram rods during this period.

This pistol may have been privately purchased by a British Army Officer, a common practice during this time, and used during the Napoleonic wars or the 1812 War with America.

It could also have been assembled by a Birmingham maker using surplus parts during or after the war of 1812.

Military style pistols, including those of British manufacture, were often purchased by American Frontiersmen from purveyors of surplus military equipment especially after the War of 1812 and the War with Mexico. These pistols were especially popular in the Fur Trade.

This pistol came from Canada and was sold to me as a Fur Trade associated gun.

I retrieved the following rolled-up paper from inside the barrel. Interesting information, but follow the "Why the Tombstone?" link in the Reference Section below -- it appears that the Tombstone mark on this pistol was not the sole province of William Dupe -- several other Gunmakers used the same mark.

[photo of British Light Dragoon pistol]
Rolled-up paper found in barrel

References


Link to the Historical Arms & Accoutrements Directory